What is an Unreliable Narrator? — Jerry Jenkins | Proven Writing Tips

[J here. These are the sorts of questions that arise in the kitchen where the sausage is made. Want my opinion, most fiction authors start out writing exactly the way they want to write, without considering the constraints and impacts of that choice. I don’t have a problem with them writing the way they want to write, but I do have an issue when they don’t realize they aren’t making it work well.]

===========

You can use a variety of literary devices to add conflict and tension to narrative fiction. But few make readers work harder than the unreliable narrator, a device that, true to its name, allows the storyteller to take readers on a wild goose chase as they determine what’s true, what’s not, and why they feel…

What is an Unreliable Narrator? — Jerry Jenkins | Proven Writing Tips

4 thoughts on “What is an Unreliable Narrator? — Jerry Jenkins | Proven Writing Tips”

  1. I think my favorite book with an unreliable narrator is The Egyptologist by Arthur Phillips. I loved that book enough that it encouraged me to attempt my own novelette using the device.

    It was a challenge though, and one I have not returned to in the intervening five years.

    I still love the device, I just prefer to read it from other writers now!

    Like

  2. Off-topic of the article, but I wonder why bestselling author Jerry Jenkins now sells writing advice? I don’t expect to get the answer, and don’t ask as a means of poking fun at Jerry, but out of genuine curiosity. I would expect him to be sailing the seas somewhere.

    Like

    1. And I’m no use, Jason, because I was actually not aware Jerry was a bestselling author (though I’m sure he’s great at what he does). Shows you how much I get around.

      Like

Leave a Reply to shawninmon Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.