The Baseball Name Pronunciation Project

Genesis of the project

I have wanted to do this for a long time, having found nothing of the sort extant online. The nearest thing we have was compiled by the now-deceased Tony Salin, author of Baseball’s Forgotten Heroes. This was a series of stories on ballplayers now mostly forgotten, but who were important in their times and had great stories to tell. Salin seems to have been a very persuasive and persistent figure, considering that he even wangled an interview with the reclusive Pete Gray (who played major league baseball with one arm). If you love the old school version of baseball, Salin’s is one of the better books.

As an afterword, Salin included a lengthy name pronunciation guide. It surely helped that he spoke to the old players in person; their pronunciations would be definitive or very nearly so. Salin is my beginning source for many pronunciations, though not the sole source. His work and research are the property of The Baseball Reliquary, Inc., which gave me kind permission to use and expand upon his material. I have since joined TBR, but nonetheless copyright of all Salin’s work that may appear here is reserved to TBR. If you wish to support their very worthwhile baseball historical preservation work and research, find membership information here.

Special thanks, therefore, first of all to Tony Salin for breaking the ground, and to Mr. Terry Cannon of TBR for his enthusiastic and rapid response to my inquiry for permission. Additional thanks to Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame, who found a number of answers for me, and had good ideas where I might locate the rest. For some of the more difficult ones, you can do as I do and thank Mr. Albert Kilchesty of TBR, who graciously volunteered his knowledge and extensive contacts, and spent a fair bit of time on behalf of this project digging through old Sporting News Registers–then invited me over to dig through some more, and plied me with great coffee while I did so. Larry Kitner, a faithful reader, has dug up plenty of pronunciations. Some of the most obscure are courtesy of John-William Greenbaum, whose bundle was a welcome bolt from the blue. Now and then I get an email from a fellow we’ll call MJY, always welcome.

If you decide to bookmark this page, your best method is to bookmark the main page, http//jkkelley.org and navigate from there. You see, I have to alter the URL of this page regularly to slow down the comment spam. However, the main page link is always correct.

One last thing: if you searched for a pronunciation, and didn’t find it here, please check back. I get notification of search strings that found this page. So if I see that someone searched on ‘joe schlabotnik pronunciation,’ and I haven’t found it yet, I’ll go digging. And odds are I’ll find it.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology A

  • Aase, Don: AH-see
  • Agee, Tommie: uh-JEE (per BR)
  • Aguayo, Luis: ah-GWAH-yo
  • Aguirre, Hank: ah-GEAR-ee (Spanish would be more like ah-GEAR-eh; BR has it as ah-GWYRE-ee, and that may have been used)
  • Aker, Jack: EH-ker (rhymes with ‘Baker’)
  • Allard, Brian: OWL-ard
  • Almeida, Rafael: all-MAY-da (Portuguese name, but he was Cuban; he probably said all-may-EE-da)
  • Almora, Oscar: owl-MORE-uh (thanks, MJY)
  • Alomar, Sandy, Sandy Jr. and Roberto: OWL-o-mar (Spanish: all-o-MAHR)
  • Altizer, Dave: ALL-ty-zur
  • Alusik, George: ah-LOO-sik (BR)
  • Alyea, Brant: AL-yay
  • Amalfitano, Joe: uh-MALL-fee-TAWN-oh (how it typically came out)
  • Amaro, Ruben: ah-MAR-oh
  • Amelung, Ed: AMM-uh-lung
  • Amoros, Sandy: AMM-or-ohs (soft S is important; like ‘ammo gross’)
  • Andújar, Joaquin: wa-KEEN AN-du-har (correct Spanish: an-DU-har)
  • Angelini, Norm: ann-je-LEE-nee
  • Aparicio, Luis: loo-EESS ah-pa-REE-see-oh (BR has it as ah-par-EACH-ee-oh, which may have been current early in his career, but Sr. Aparicio is not Italian)
  • Apodaca, Bob: APP-oh-DACK-uh (per BR)
  • Arcia, José: ho-ZAY AR-see-ah
  • Arcia, Oswaldo: o-WAL-doh AR-see-ah (as interviewed in his native Spanish; he will probably endure oz-WALL-doh ar-SEE-ah from American commentators)
  • Arlett, Buzz: ar-LET
  • Arlin, Steve: rhymes with ‘Carlin’ as in comedian George
  • Arrigo, Gerry: ah-REE-go (per BR)
  • Arroyo, Luis: loo-EESSE uh-ROY-o
  • Aspromonte, Bob and Ken: azz-pro-MON-tay
  • Auerbach, Rick: AR-bock (when said quickly; OW-ur-bock when sounded out; thanks, Larry and Michael)
  • Auker, Elden: OCK-er (YT of trailer promoting his book, which by the way is a great read)
  • Averill, Earl Sr. and Jr.: EH-ver-ull (rhymes with ‘flavorful’)
  • Ávila, Bobby: ah-VEE-la (correct Spanish: AH-vee-lah)
  • Ayala, Benny: eye-ALL-ah
  • Azcue, Joe: AS-kyu (like ‘has to’ or ‘haz to’)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top B

  • Bacque, Gene: BAH-kay
  • Bacsik, Mike: BASS-ik
  • Baczewski, Fred: BAH-jess-key
  • Bahnsen, Stan: BONN-sen
  • Balaz, John: BAL-ash (rhymes with ‘foul ash’)
  • Baldschun, Jack: BALL-shun
  • Ballinger, Mark: BOW-lin-jur (first syllable rhymes with ‘how’)
  • Ballou, Win: buh-LOO
  • Barbare, Walter: BAW-bar
  • Barbieri, Jim: bar-BEER-ee (thanks, John-William)
  • Barnabe, Charlie: ???
  • Barojas, Salome: sah-LOAM bah-RO-hoss (in his native Spanish, sah-LO-may)
  • Barranca, German: ba-RONK-ah
  • Barrios, José: BAR-ee-ohss
  • Bartirome, Tony: BAR-tih-roam (thanks, M.J.Y.)
  • Bathe, Bill or Bob: BAYTH
  • Bauman, Joe: BAU-man
  • Baumann, Frank: BOW-man
  • Bauta, Ed: bah-OO-tuh (per BR; credible)
  • Beattie, Jim: BEE-tee
  • Beauchamp, Jim: BEE-chum
  • Bedell, Howie: buh-DELL
  • Bedrosian, Steve: bed-ROZE-ee-un
  • Beede, Tyler: BEE-dee (thanks, MJY)
  • Bejma, Ollie: BAY-ma
  • Belanger, Mark: bel-LANN-zher (from credible anecdote of asking the player)
  • Benge, Ray: BENJ
  • Bengough, Benny: ben-GO
  • Beníquez, Juan: beh-NEE-kez
  • Berenguer, Juan: BAIR-en-gair
  • Berenyi, Bruce: ber-ENN-ee
  • Bernal, Victor: bur-NAL
  • Bernier, Carlos: bur-NEAR
  • Bertaina, Frank: ???
  • Bertoia, Reno: bur-TOY-ah (thanks, Alex)
  • Bessent, Don: buh-SENT
  • Bethea, Bill: bah-THAY (soft TH; per BR)
  • Bevacqua, Kurt: be-VAH-kwa
  • Biancalana, Buddy: bee-AHN-ka-la-na
  • Biercevicz, Greg: bur-SEVV-itch
  • Biittner, Larry: BIT-nur
  • Bjorkman, George: buh-JORK-man
  • Blackwell, Ewell: YOOL BLACK-wul
  • Bladergroen, Ian: BLAY-der-groh-uhn (thanks, MJY)
  • Blasingame, Don and Wade: BLASS-in-game (rhymes with ‘sass in fame’)
  • Blefary, Curt: BLEF-ah-ree
  • Blomberg, Ron: BLOOM-berg
  • Bleuge, Ossie or Otto: BLUE-jee
  • Blue, Vida: VY-da (rhymes with ‘Ida’)
  • Blyleven, Bert: BLYE-lev-en
  • Blyzka, Mike: BLIZZ-kuh
  • Boccabella, John: BOCK-ah-bell-uh (per BR; might be off)
  • Bochte, Bruce: BOCK-tee
  • Bochy, Bruce: BOE-chee
  • Boddicker, Mike: BODD-ick-ur
  • Boeckel, Tony: ???
  • Boehling, Joe: ???
  • Boehmer, Len: BAY-mer
  • Boever, Joe: BAY-ver
  • Boggess, Dusty: BAW-jess (from 1957 broadcast)
  • Bohne, Sammy: BONE
  • Bohnet, John: bo-NETT
  • Boisclair, Bruce: BO-clair (rather than French BWA-CLAIR)
  • Boitano, Danny: boy-TAHN-oh
  • Boken, Bob: ???
  • Bolin, Bob: like ‘bowling’ without the G
  • Bolling, Frank: like ‘bowling’ with the G
  • Bonham, Tiny: BONN-um (from period broadcast)
  • Bonura, Zeke: ???
  • Bordagaray, Frenchy: bor-duh-gah-RAY
  • Boros, Steve: BOAR-ihs
  • Bosley, Thad: BAHZ-lee
  • Boswell, Ken and Dave: BOZZ-well
  • Botelho, Derek: bo-TELL-oh
  • Bouchee, Ed: boo-SHAY
  • Boudreau, Lou: BOO-dro (verified by second party hearing him introduce himself as announcer)
  • Bourque, Pat: BURK
  • Bouton, Jim: BAUT-un (rhymes with ‘how fun’; the T is very faint)
  • Brabender, Gene: BRABB-en-dur
  • Brazle, Al: BRAZZ-lee (from period broadcast; at least that’s how I think I heard it)
  • Breazeale, Jim: bruh-ZILL
  • Brecheen, Harry: bruh-KEEN (verified by living relative)
  • Bressoud, Eddie: bruh-SUE
  • Brideweser, Jim: BRYDE-wee-zur
  • Broaca, Johnny: bro-AH-kah (thanks, Alex; a 1934 radio broadcast renders it BRO-kah, and Phil Rizzuto pronounced it BROCK-ah (thanks, Mac), thus, jury still out)
  • Broglio, Ernie: BRO-lee-oh
  • Brohamer, Jack: BRO-ham-ur
  • Brouhard, Mark: BRO-hard
  • Brouthers, Dan: BROO-thurz (soft TH, I believe; unfortunately English phonics do not provide a good way to make clear whether it is the soft or hard TH)
  • Browne, Pidge: BROWN-ee
  • Brunet, George: brue-NET or brue-NAY
  • Brusstar, Warren: BROO-stur
  • Buchek, Jerry: BOO-check (per BR)
  • Buhl, Bob: rhymes with ‘jewel’ (per BR)
  • Burda, Bob: BURR-dah
  • Burkett, Jesse: BUR-ket
  • Bush, Donie: DOE-nee
  • Busse, Ray: BYU-see (thanks, Larry)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top C

  • Cabell, Enos: EE-nus kuh-BELL
  • Calise, Mike: kuh-LEEZ (at least, that’s what the 1983 BR implies)
  • Cardenal, José: kar-duh-NAHL
  • Cárdenas, Leo: KAR-duh-ness (Spanish would be KAR-day-nahs)
  • Cadore, Leon: ka-DORE
  • Campisi, Sal: kam-PEE-zee
  • Cannizzaro, Chris: CAN-i-ZAER-oh (rhymes ‘hand in barrow’; from near relative)
  • Carreon, Cam and Mark: ka-REE-onn (BR has it as ‘CAR-ee-on)
  • Carrithers, Don: ka-RITH-ers (hard TH as in ‘that’; rhymes with ‘the dithers’)
  • Castillo, Manny: kahs-TEE-yo
  • Castillo, Rusney: ROOZ-nay kahs-TEE-yo (thanks, MJY)
  • Cavaretta, Phil: ka-va-RETT-ah
  • Caveney, Ike: KAV-en-ee
  • Ceccarelli, Art: chick-a-RELL-ee
  • Cedeño, César: SAY-zar seh-DANE-yo
  • Cepeda, Orlando: or-LON-doh seh-PAY-da
  • Cerone, Rick: sa-RONE
  • Cerv, Bob: SERVE
  • Cey, Ron: SAY
  • Chakales, Bob: SHACK-ulls
  • Chambliss, Chris: CHAMM-bliss
  • Charboneau, Joe: SHAR-ben-oh
  • Chiozza, Lou: ???
  • Chiti, Harry: CHEE-tee
  • Chouinard, Felix: shwee-NARD (the actual French is close to that)
  • Cheney, Larry: ??? (probably like Tom below, but not verified)
  • Cheney, Tom: CHAIN-ee
  • Cicotte, Al: SEE-cot (at some point evidently was also sigh-COT-ee; younger kin of Eddie)
  • Cicotte, Eddie: SEE-cot (name is of French origin, not Italian; in French, SEE COAT)
  • Cimoli, Gino: sim-O-lee or chim-O-lee (correct Italian is CHEE-mo-lee)
  • Clendenon, Donn: clen-DEN-un
  • Cloninger, Tony: KLONN-ing-er (per BR)
  • Closter, Al: ???
  • Colavito, Rocky: CO-la-VEE-toh
  • Combs, Earle: KOOMBZ
  • Concepción, Dave & Onix: cone-sep-see-OHN
  • Coombs, Jack: KOOMZ
  • Coscarart, Pete: KOSS-kar-art
  • Cottier, Chuck: COT-ee-er (BR has it as cot-TEE-er; I don’t buy it)
  • Cottrell, Ensign: ???
  • Coveleski, Harry and Stan: ko-va-LESS-kee
  • Cravath, Gavvy: kra-VATH (rhymes with ‘the bath’; second party family contact verified)
  • Criger, Lou: CRIGG-ur
  • Critz, Hughie: KRYTZE (rhymes with ‘rights’)
  • Cromartie, Warren: kro-MAR-dee (unless you are sounding out every letter, then -tee)
  • Cronin, Joe: KROH-nin (like ‘toe pin’)
  • Cuellar, Bobby or Mike: KWAY-arr (only in Castilian Spanish do you hear an LY; both men are Latin American)
  • Cuyler, Kiki: KAI-kai KAI-lur (rhymes with ‘thigh high styler’)
  • Cvengros, Mike: SVEN-grohss (like ‘Sven grows’ but ending in a soft S)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top D

  • D’Acquisto, John: DEE-ah-KWISS-toe (verified by subject on a Youtube; in Italian, I believe, DACK-weess-toe)
  • Dalrymple, Clay: dal-RIM-pull (per BR, which may or may not be right
  • DaVanon, Jeff and Jerry: da-VANN-en
  • Daubert, Jake: DOW-burt (rhymes with ‘cow hurt’)
  • Dauss, Hooks: DOSS (rhymes with ‘floss’)
  • Deas, Pete: DEE-is (non-MLB; one of Salin’s sources, thus included out of respect and thanks)
  • DeBusschere, Dave: day-BUSH-er
  • DeCinces, Doug: duh-SIN-say
  • Dedeaux, Rod: DEE-doe
  • deGrom, Jacob: duh-GROMM (thanks, MJY)
  • DeJesús, Iván: day-HAY-soose
  • de la Hoz, Mike: dell-ah-HOZZ
  • Delancey, Bill: deh-LANN-see
  • Delock, Ike: DAY-lock (per BR; I think probably right)
  • de los Santos, Ramón: day-lo-SAHN-toess
  • Demaree, Frank: DEM-uh-ree (from period broadcast)
  • Demeter, Don or Steve: DEM-it-ur
  • DeMola, Don: duh-MOLE-ah
  • Dernier, Bob: dur-NEER
  • Derringer, Paul: just like the famous pistol
  • De Sa, Joe: day-sah (equal stress)
  • Desautels, Gene: deh-ZUH-tell
  • Desjarlais, Keith: DAY-jar-lay
  • Detore, George: DEE-tore
  • Dettore, Tom: deh-TOR (per former teammate Carmen Fanzone)
  • Devers, Rafael: DAY-vers (thanks, MJY)
  • Devore, Josh: deh-VORE
  • Díaz, Bo: DEE-ahz
  • Didier, Bob: DEE-dee-eh
  • Dietz, Dick: DEETZ
  • Dihigo, Martín: mar-TEEN duh-HEE-go (Spanish: dee-EE-gho)
  • DiLauro, Jack: deh-LAWR-oh
  • Diloné, Miguel: dee-loh-NAY
  • Doerr, Bobby: DORE
  • Doran, Bill: doh-RAN
  • Douthit, Taylor: DAU-thit (rhymes with ‘cow spit’)
  • Drabowsky, Moe: dra-BAU-skee (middle syllable rhymes with ‘cow’)
  • Drago, Dick: DRAY-go (thanks, Alex)
  • Dreisewerd, Clem: DRIZE-werd
  • Dropo, Walt: DRO-po
  • Drucke, Louis: ???
  • Dubuc, Jean: duh-BUKE (French: DU BEUK with a really tight U sound and understated C)
  • Durocher, Leo: du-RO-shur
  • Dybzinski, Jerry: dib-ZIN-skee
  • Dyck, Jim: DIKE (some owners of the name rhyme it with ‘rick’; I can see why some do not)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top E

  • Eaddy, Don: ED-ee
  • Eayrs, Eddie: ???
  • Edelen, Joe: EE-duh-lun
  • Ehmke, Howard: EM-kee (per baseball-reference.com and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Eichelberger, Juan: EYE-kel-bur-gur
  • Eilers, Dave: EYE-lerz (per BR)
  • Eisenreich, Jim: EYES-en-ryke
  • Epstein, Mike: EP-steen (Originally had this as ‘EP-stein.’ Duh. “Big help, ‘Lancer, I could never have guessed!”)
  • Ernaga, Frank: ur-NEH-ga (like ‘bodega,’ from 1957 radio broadcast)
  • Erskine, Carl: UR-skin (like ‘curse kin’)
  • Esasky, Nick: ee-SAH-skee
  • Essegian, Chuck: uh-SEE-jee-un
  • Essian, Jim: ESS-ee-en
  • Estelle, Dick: ess-TELL (per BR)
  • Evers, Hoot, Joe and Johnny: EE-verz (However, Johnny said later in life that it was actually EV-erz (rhyming with ‘nevers’), but that everyone in his hometown pronounced it with a long E. My information is that baseball used the long E as well.)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top F

  • Faedo, Lenny: fah-EH-doh
  • Fairey, Jim: ???
  • Falcone, Pete: fowl-CONE
  • Fanzone, Carmen: like ‘fan zone’
  • Faria, Jacob: fa-FEE-uh
  • Fazio, Ernie: FASS-ee-oh (per BR)
  • Ferrara, Al: fur-AIR-uh (per BR)
  • Ferrarese, Don: ferr-ARE-see
  • Fidrych, Mark: FID-rich
  • Fillingim, Dana: ???
  • Fiore, Mike: FEE-or-ee (thanks, Larry)
  • Fireovid, Steve: FIRE-oh-vid
  • Flodin, Lloyd: flo-DEEN (thanks, John-William)
  • Floethe, Chris: FLOW-thee (soft TH; per BR)
  • Foiles, Hank: FOY-els (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Fondy, Dee: FONN-dee
  • Fornieles, Mike: for-NEE-lis (Spanish: for-ni-EH-lays)
  • Forsythe, Logan: sounds like ‘foresight’ with soft ‘th’ as last consonant, thus like ‘for scythe’ (thanks, MJY)
  • Fosse, Ray: FOSS-ee
  • Foucault, Steve: foo-COE (thanks, Alex)
  • Fournier, Jack: for-NEAR
  • Fowlkes, Alan: FOLKS
  • Frazee, Harry: FRAY-zee
  • Freed, Roger: rhymes with ‘need’
  • Freehan, Bill: FREE-an
  • Freese, Gene: FREEZ
  • Freisleben, Dave: FREEZ-leb-en
  • Freitas, Tony: FRAY-tiss
  • Frey, Benny: FRY
  • Frias, Pepe: FREE-us (probably from having to play in Parc Jarry)
  • Frisella, Danny: frih-SELL-uh
  • Fuchs, Emil: EH-mill FYOOKS
  • Fulgham, John: FULL-jum
  • Furillo, Carl: fuh-RILL-oh
  • Futch, Ike: rhymes with ‘much.’ Thanks, John-William.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top G

  • Gaedel, Eddie: guh-DELL
  • Gaetti, Gary: gy-ETT-ee
  • Gagliano, Phil: gag-LEE-ah-no
  • Gagne, Greg: GAHN-yay
  • Galan, Augie: guh-LANN
  • Garrelts, Scott: guh-RELTZ
  • Garrido, Gil: ???
  • Gebhard, Bob: ???
  • Gedeon, Joe: GID-ee-un
  • Gehringer, Chuck: GERR-ing-er (both Gs are hard)
  • Genewich, Joe: ???
  • Gentile, Jim: jen-TEEL
  • Gerónimo, César: SAY-zar juh-RON-ih-mo (most commonly; pretty sure he would pronounce the last name ‘heh-ROH-nee-moh)
  • Gharrity, Patsy: rhymes with ‘ferrety’
  • Giebell, Floyd: GEE-bil
  • Giel, Paul: GEEL
  • Gilliam, Jim: GILL-ee-yum
  • Gionfriddo, Al: john-FREE-doh
  • Giusti, Dave: JUST-ee
  • Goetz, Larry and Russ: GETZ
  • Gogolewski, Bill: GO-go-LISS-kee
  • Goryl, John: GOR-ul
  • Gosger, Jim: GOZZ-ger (hard Gs; thanks, John-William)
  • Goslin, Goose: GOZZ-lin
  • Gotay, Julio: GO-tie (thanks, John-William)
  • Grabiner, Harry: ???
  • Grba, Eli: GERB-ah
  • Greif, Bill: GRIFE (rhymes with ‘strife’)
  • Grich, Bobby: (rhymes with ‘itch’)
  • Grote, Jerry: GROW-tee
  • Groth, Johnny: GROWTH
  • Grzenda, Joe: greh-ZEN-duh
  • Guerra, Mike: GEHR-ah
  • Guerrieri, Taylor: gur-AIR-ee (thanks, MJY)
  • Guidry, Ron: GID-ree
  • Guindon, Bob: GIN-din (hard G; per BR)
  • Guinn, Skip: KWIHN
  • Guisto, Louie: GISS-toe
  • Gustine, Frankie: GUSS-teen
  • Gutiérrez, César: SAY-zar GOO-tee-err-ez (Spanish of the last name would accent the third syllable)
  • Gwosdz, Doug: GOOSH

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top H

  • Haak, Howie: HAKE
  • Haas, Bert, Bruno, Eddie and Mule: HOSS
  • Hafey, Chick: HAY-fee
  • Hambright, Roger: HAM-brite (rhymes with ‘lamb fight;’ thanks, Larry)
  • Hanebrink, Harry: HAIN-uh-brink
  • Hargesheimer, Al: HAR-guh-shy-mer
  • Hauser, Joe: HOW-zer
  • Hausman, Tom: HOWS-man
  • Haydel, Hal: hay-DELL
  • Heaverlo, Dave: HAVE-er-lo (Eastern Washington represent! Verified from audio interview on YT.)
  • Hebert, Billy: HEE-burt
  • Hebert, Wallace: EH-bare (the French way)
  • Heidemann, Jack: HIGH-da-man
  • Heilmann, Harry: HILE-man (like ‘file can’)
  • Heise, Bob: HI-see
  • Henrich, Tommy: HEN-rick
  • Hernáiz, Jesús: hay-SOOSE hur-NICE (per BR; just enough of a butchering of Spanish to be credible)
  • Herrnstein, John: HERN-styne (per BR)
  • Heving, Joe: ???
  • Himsl, Vedie: HIM-zul
  • Hisle, Larry: HIGH-sull
  • Hodapp, Johnny: HOE-dapp
  • Hoeft, Billy: HEFT
  • Hollocher, Charlie: ???
  • Horne, Beryln: HORN
  • Hosley, Tim: HOZE-lee
  • Hough, Charlie: HUFF
  • Houk, Ralph: HOWK (like ‘howl’ but ending in K)
  • Hovley, Steve: HOVE-lee (rhymes with ‘trove see’)
  • Hrabosky, Al: ruh-BAH-skee
  • Hrbek, Kent: HUR-bek
  • Hriniak, Walt: RIN-ee-ack
  • Hume, Tom: YOOM
  • Huyke, Woody: HI-kee

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top I

  • Ignasiak, Gary: EEG-nah-shock (per BR; I think they had a few too many in the press room that day)
  • Inao, Kazuhisa: IN-ow (as if saying ‘in-out’ without the T)
  • Iorg, Dane and Garth: ORJ

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top J

  • Jaeckel, Paul: JAY-kull
  • Janvrin, Hal: ???
  • Jata, Paul: JAH-ta
  • Javier, Julián and Stan: hoo-lee-ON hav-ee-AIR (rhymes with ‘ah, the air’)
  • Jenkins, Fergie: FUR-gee (rhymes with ‘bergy’)
  • Jenkins, Tyrell: tigh-RELL (thanks, MJY)
  • Jestadt, Garry: JESS-tat (like ‘yes hat’)
  • Jiménez, Eloy: EE-loy hee-MEN-ezz (thanks, MJY)
  • Jiménez, Manny: HIM-en-ezz (per BR; correct Spanish would be more like hee-MEH-nezz)
  • Johnson, Deron: ???
  • Jorgens, Arndt: JOR-genz
  • Jourdan, Ted: JORR-den
  • Judnich, Walt: JUD-nick
  • Jurado, Ariel: ah-ree-EL (thanks, MJY)
  • Jurak, Ed: YOU-rack
  • Jurges, Billy: JUR-gezz
  • Jutze, Skip: jut-ZEE (thanks, Buddy)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top K

  • Kaat, Jim: KOTT
  • Kahler, George: ???
  • Kaline, Al: KAY-lyne (rhymes with ‘daytime’)
  • Kanehl, Rod: KAH-neel (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Karkovice, Ron: KAR-ko-vyse
  • Katt, Ray: KOTT
  • Kauff, Benny: rhymes with ‘cough’
  • Kealey, Steve: ???
  • Kekich, Mike: KEKK-itch
  • Keltner, Ken: KELT-ner
  • Kenders, Al: KIN-derz (thanks, John-William)
  • Keough, Joe: KEE-oh
  • Keppinger, Jeff: KEPP-in-jure (thanks, MJY)
  • Kiely, Leo: KY-lee (rhymes with ‘Riley’)
  • Kilkenny, Mike: KILL-ken-nee
  • Killebrew, Harmon: KILL-uh-broo (the pride of Idaho baseball)
  • Kiner, Ralph: KY-ner (rhymes with ‘whiner,’ such an inapposite cue)
  • Kirke, Jay: ???
  • Kison, Bruce: KEE-son (if I get this wrong after living about four miles from his high school, I’m so toast)
  • Klaus, Billy: KLOUSE
  • Klieman, Ed: KLY-man (from old radio broadcast)
  • Knabe, Otto: ka-NOBB-eh (per Burns documentary, and Burns tends to be pretty good; thanks, Michael)
  • Knetzer, Elmer: ???
  • Knepper, Bob: NEPP-ur
  • Kniffin, Chuck: NIFF-un (per BR)
  • Knoop, Bobby: kuh-NOP (rhymes with ‘the cop’)
  • Kobel, Kevin: ???
  • Koenecke, Len: KENN-uh-key (90% verified by phone conversation with distant relative; thanks, Kurt!)
  • Koenig, Fred and Mark: KAY-nig
  • Komminsk, Brad: kuh-MINSK
  • Konieczny, Doug: kuh-NEZ-nee
  • Konstanty, Jim: kon-STAN-tee
  • Konyha, Lou: played as CONE-ya but accepts CON-ya (thanks, John-William)
  • Kopacz, George: KOH-pazz (per BR)
  • Koppe, Joe: kop-EE (like ‘copy’ if you stressed the second syllable)
  • Koshorek, Clem: kuh-SHOR-uk (thanks, MJY)
  • Kostro, Frank: kos-TROE (per BR; I have my doubts)
  • Koufax, Sandy: KOE-faks
  • Kralick, Jack: kray-LICK (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Krapp, Gene: ??? (I’m hoping for something other than the obvious and painful)
  • Krausse, Lew: KRAUS (rhymes with ‘house’)
  • Kremer, Ray: KRAY-mer
  • Krenchicki, Wayne: kren-CHICK-ee
  • Kreutzer, Frank: KROY-tzur (per BR)
  • Krsnich, Rocky: KURZ-nitch
  • Krug, Chris: KROOG
  • Krukow, Mike: KRU-ko
  • Kubek, Tony: KOO-bek
  • Kucek, Jack: KYOO-zekk (might also be KYOO-chek; jury’s out, and he didn’t respond to my email, darn it)
  • Kucharski, Joe: ku-CHAR-skee
  • Kucks, Johnny: COOKS
  • Kuehl, Karl: KEEL
  • Kuenn, Harvey: KEEN (verified by living relative)
  • Kuiper, Duane: KYE-per (rhymes with ‘tiger’)
  • Kuntz, Rusty: KOONTZ
  • Kurowski, Whitey: kur-OW-skee (from period broadcast)
  • Kusnyer, Art: KUSH-ner
  • Kutyna, Marty: kuh-TEE-nah (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Kuzava, Bob: ku-ZAW-vah (thanks, Buddy)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top L

  • Laabs, Chet: ???
  • Labine, Clem: la-BINE (rhymes with ‘the pine’)
  • Lachemann, Marcel and René: LATCH-eh-man (verified from newscast; they’re French Canadian with a German-looking name, but in French it would be LAWSH-MOHN with the N just a hint. BR says LATCH-man, and some may have said it that way.)
  • LaCorte, Frank: luh-KORT-ee
  • Lafitte, Ed: la-FEET (almost surely; thanks, John-William)
  • LaFrancois, Roger: lah-fran-swah (even stress)
  • LaGrow, Lerrin: LAIR-in la-GROE (rhymes with ‘hair in the joe’; thanks, Alex)
  • Lahoud, Joe: la-WHO
  • Lajoie, Nap: LA-zha-way (evidently a very common butchering, which the affable batting champ tolerated in good spirit) or la ZHWAH (nearly correct French; the language does not stress syllables, but a second party with a credible claim to be a relative states that Lajoie preferred this, and that it’s the family pronunciation)
  • Lamabe, Jack: la-MABE (rhymes with ‘the save’; per baseball-reference.com and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Lampe, Jim: LAM-pee (per BR)
  • Landreaux, Ken: LAN-droh
  • Lau, Charlie: rhymes with ‘now’ (son pronounces it this way)
  • Laudner, Tim: LODD-ner
  • Lauzerique, George: LA-zer-eek (per BR)
  • Lavagetto, Cookie: lav-uh-JET-oh
  • Lavalliere, Mike: luh-VOLL-yer (French would be LA VAHL YEHR)
  • Lavan, Doc: ??? (I’m guessing ‘LAY-ven’ as it used to be ‘Laven’)
  • Lazzeri, Tony: la-ZER-ee
  • Lea, Charlie: LEE
  • Leathers, Hal: just like the material
  • LeBourveau, Bevo: luh-BOR-vo
  • Leclerc, José: luh-KLAYRK (like ‘cleric’ without the I; thanks, MJY)
  • Lee, Leron: LEE-ron
  • Lefebvre, Jim and Tip: luh-FEE-ver
  • Lefebvre, Joe: luh-FAY (the original French would be LUH-FEHV, so about halfway between)
  • Lehew, Jim: LAY-hugh (rhymes with ‘play hugh’; thanks, John-William)
  • Leibold, Nemo: LEE-bold
  • Leibrandt, Charlie: LEE-brant
  • Lelivelt, Jack: (there is reason to suppose it was LELL-ih-vett based on misspellings; jury out)
  • Lemanczyk, Dave: luh-MAN-chick
  • Leonhard, Dave: LEN-ahrd (with more of an ‘ah’ sound than ‘Leonard’)
  • Lepcio, Ted: ???
  • Lewallyn, Denny: loo-ELL-en
  • Lezcano, Sixto: lezz-KAHN-oh
  • Liddle, Don: LID-ul
  • Lien, Al: LEEN
  • Linares, Rufino: luh-NAHR-ess
  • Lindell, Johnny: linn-DELL
  • Lipon, Johnny: LIPP-on (like ‘sip on’)
  • Liriano, Rymer: like ‘rhymer,’ lee-ree-AH-no (thanks, MJY)
  • Lis, Joe: LISS (rhymes with ‘kiss;’ thank you, Mac)
  • Littell, Mark: luh-TELL
  • Litwhiler, Danny: LITT-why-lur
  • Llenas, Winston: YAY-nas
  • Lobert, Hans: HANDS LOH-bert (recording of his own voice)
  • Lodigiani, Dario: lo-duh-JONN-ee
  • Loes, Billy: LOZE (rhymes with ‘hose’; per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Lolich, Mickey and Ron: LOW-litch (like ‘toe itch’)
  • Lonnett, Joe: lon-ETT
  • Lopes, Davey: rhymes with ‘ropes’
  • Lovitto, Joe: lo-VEE-toe (per BR; I’ll say probably)
  • Lovrich, Peter: LOVE-rich
  • Lowenstein, John: LOW-in-stine
  • Lown, Turk: rhymes with ‘town’
  • Lubratich, Steve: luh-BRAT-itch (per video from his alma mater; BR says LU-brah-tich, I think his alma mater knew him better)
  • Lucchesi, Frank: loo-CASE-ee
  • Luebber, Steve: LOO-ber
  • Lumpe, Jerry: LUMP-ee (per BR)
  • Luplow, Alvin: loop-LOE (per BR; dubious, in my estimation)
  • Luque, Adolfo: LOO-kay
  • Lusader, Scott: lu-SAY-der (thanks, MJY)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top M

  • Machemehl, Chuck: MOCK-eh-mell
  • Mackanin, Pete: mah-KAN-in
  • Mackiewicz, Felix: MACK-uh-wits
  • MacPhail, Larry and Lee: muk-FALE
  • Mahler, Mickey and Rick: MAY-ler
  • Maisel, Fritz and George: MY-zell
  • Maler, Jim: MAY-ler
  • Malzone, Frank: mal-ZONE (Italian would be mal-ZONE-ee)
  • Mamaux, Al: ma-MOO
  • Manaea, Sean: muh-NIGH-uh (like ‘Shania,’ as in Twain; thanks, MJY)
  • Mangual, Ángel: ON-hel mon-GWALL, though often pronounced AIN-jell man-GWELL by announcers; some question about how he pronounced it
  • Mantilla, Félix: man-TEE-ya
  • Manush, Frank and Heinie: ma-NOOSH
  • Marchildon, Phil: MAR-shill-dun
  • Marichal, Juan: MAYRE-uh-shal (proper Spanish: mar-ee-CHAWL)
  • Marquard, Rube: MARK-ward (per baseball-reference.com and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame; French is roughly MAR-KAHR)
  • Marrero, Deven: DEVV-uhn (thanks, MJY)
  • Mashore, Clyde: ma-SHOR
  • Masi, Phil: MAY-see (soft S)
  • Matchick, Tom: MATT-chick
  • Matuszek, Len: muh-TU-zek
  • Mauch, Gene: MOCK (which no sane ballplayer ever did to the tempestuous Mauch)
  • Mazara, Nomar: muh-ZAHR-uh (thanks, MJY)
  • Mazeroski, Bill: mazz-er-AWSS-kee (like ‘has her oskie’)
  • McElveen, Pryor: ???
  • McEnaney, Will: MACK-uh-nenn-ee (from subject on YT interview)
  • McGaha, Mel: muh-GAY-uh
  • McGlothen, Lynn: muh-GLAW-then
  • McGlothlin, Jim: muh-GLAWTH-len
  • McLaughlin, Byron: ???
  • McLaughlin, Joey: ???
  • McNertney, Jerry: mick-NURT-nee (thanks, John-William)
  • Meador, Johnny: ???
  • Medich, Doc: MEDD-itch
  • Melanson, Mark: muh-LANN-sun (thanks, MJY)
  • Melillo, Oscar: muh-LILL-oh
  • Menke, Denis: MAIN-key (with a real soft N)
  • Meoli, Rudy: mee-OH-lee
  • Mertes, Sam: MUR-teez
  • Meusel, Bob and Irish: ???
  • Milbourne, Larry: MILL-born
  • Millán, Félix: FEE-lix mee-YON (Spanish: FAY-lix)
  • Minarcin, Rudy: min-AR-sin
  • Mincher, Don: ???
  • Mingori, Steve: min-GORE-ee
  • Miñoso, Minnie: mi-NO-so (Spanish: mee-NYO-so)
  • Mitterwald, George: MITT-er-wald
  • Mizell, Wilmer: my-ZELL (rhymes with ‘my hell’)
  • Mogridge, George: ???
  • Molinaro, Bobby: MOLE-in-ah-ro (per BR; I have reservations)
  • Monbouquette, Bill: MON-bu-ket
  • Moncada, Yoan: yoh-AHN (thanks, MJY)
  • Monge, Sid: MON-guh (BR says MON-jee; ain’t quite sure)
  • Montañez, Willie: mon-TAN-yez
  • Montas, Francellis: fran-SELL-iss MAHN-tahs (thanks, MJY)
  • Monteagudo, Aurelio and René: mon-tee-ah-GOO-doe (Spanish: mon-tay-ah-GOO-doe)
  • Montefusco, John: mon-tuh-FYOO-skoh
  • Montemayor, Felipe: feh-LEE-pay MONN-teh-MY-or
  • Morales, Jerry, José, and Rich: mor-AHL-ezz
  • Moret, Rogelio: roe-HEE-lee-o mor-EH or mor-ETT (haven’t fully sorted out when the last name has the French pronunciation; he was Puerto Rican, so mor-ETT makes more sense)
  • Moryn, Walt: MORE-in (from old TV broadcast)
  • Mostil, Johnny: MOSS-till
  • Motte, Jason: rhymes with ‘hot’ (thanks, MJY)
  • Mueller, Don: MULE-er
  • Muncrief, Bob: MUNN-kreef
  • Muñoz, Yairo: rhymes with ‘Cairo’ (thanks, MJY)
  • Murrell, Ivan: mur-RELL
  • Musial, Stan: MYOOZH-al (routinely given as MYOOZH-you-ul, MOOZ-ee-al or MYOOZH-ee-al; some uncertainty exists as to how Stan pronounced it, since he rarely talked about himself)
  • Mutis, Jeff: MYOO-tiss

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top N

  • Narum, Les: NARR-um (per BR)
  • Necciai, Ron: NETCH-eye
  • Neibauer, Gary: NYE-bow-ur (per BR)
  • Neiger, Al: rhymes with ‘tiger’; thanks, John-William
  • Neun, Johnny: NOON
  • Nevers, Ernie: NEV-urs (verified by descendant)
  • Niarhos, Gus: NYE-ur-hoss
  • Niehoff, Bert: NEE-hoff
  • Niekro, Joe and Phil: NEE-kro
  • Nieman, Bob: ???
  • Niemiec, Al: ??? (a modern owner of the name pronounces it NEE-mick)
  • Noble, Ray: NO-blay
  • Nola, Aaron: as English ‘Aaron’ (thanks, MJY)
  • Northrup, Jim: NOR-thruhp
  • Nottebart, Don: NOTT-uh-bart

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top O

  • Oceak, Frank: oh-SEE-ack (per BR)
  • Oeschger, Joe: ESH-gur
  • Oliva, Tony: oh-LEE-va
  • Ontiveros, Steve and Steve: ON-ti-VARE-ohse (last part like ‘lactose’)
  • Osteen, Claude: oh-STEEN (per baseball-reference.com and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top P

  • Paciorek, Jim, John, Mike and Tom: pah-CHOR-ik
  • Paepke, Dennis and Jack: PAPP-key
  • Pagan, Dave: PAY-gun (confirmed by Yankees media guide plus a call to Dave’s home town in Saskatchewan; thanks, Larry)
  • Pagán, José: ho-ZAY pa-GONE (also rhymes with ‘the fawn’)
  • Pagliaroni, Jim: pag-lee-ah-ROH-nee (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Pagliarulo, Mike: pal-ee-ah-RULE-oh
  • Palica, Bo and Erv: pah-LEE-kuh
  • Palys, Stan: PAL-iss
  • Papa, John: played as PAPP-uh, pronounces it PAH-puh (thanks, John-William)
  • Pape, Larry: ???
  • Pasley, Kevin: PAY-slee
  • Passeau, Claude: pass-OH
  • Patek, Freddie: PAW-tek
  • Patrylo, Bob: puh-TRY-loh (thanks, John-William)
  • Pascual, Camilo: ca-MEE-lo pass-KWALL (last name per BR)
  • Paulino, David: pah-LEE-no (thanks, MJY)
  • Pavletich, Don: pav-LET-ik
  • Peckinpaugh, Roger: PECK-in-paw
  • Pederson, Joc: JOCK PEE-der-son (thanks, MJY)
  • Pelekoudas, Chris: pel-uh-KOO-duss (per BR)
  • Pepitone, Joe: PEP-i-tone
  • Pérez, Tony: peh-REZZ (Spanish: PARE-ess)
  • Peralta, David: as English ‘David’ (thanks, MJY)
  • Perranoski, Ron: pair-uh-NAWSS-kee
  • Perzanowski, Stan: ???
  • Petrocelli, Rico: pet-ro-SELL-ee (rather than the Italian pet-ro-CHELL-ee)
  • Pfeffer, Jeff: PEFF-er (per a relative of both Jeff Pfeffers–thanks, Tom!)
  • Pfeil, Bobby: exactly like ‘file’; per SABR interview and article
  • Pfister, Daniel: FISS-ter
  • Phillippe, Deacon: FILL-eh-pee (some insist that it is fill-EEP; name was originally ‘Phillipi’; jury’s out)
  • Phoebus, Tom: FEE-bus
  • Picciolo, Rob: PEACH-uh-lo
  • Piche, Ron: pee-SHAY
  • Picinich, Val: pah-SIN-itch
  • Piet, Tony: PEE-a
  • Pignatano, Joe: pig-na-TAWN-oh (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Pilarcik, Al: pill-AR-sick
  • Pillette, Duane and Herman: pih-LETT
  • Piña, Horacio: hor-EH-shee-oh PEE-na (by most baseball people at the time; a native Spanish speaker, he pronounces it or-AH-see-oh PEEN-ya)
  • Pinson, Vada: VAY-dah PINN-sun (per son)
  • Pipgras, George: ???
  • Pleis, Billy: PLICE (rhymes with ‘spice’; per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Pocoroba, Biff: po-ko-ROE-buh
  • Podgajny, Johnny: puh-JONN-ee
  • Podres, Johnny: PAH-draze
  • Poepping, Mike: PEPP-ing
  • Pollet, Howie: puh-LETT
  • Ponce, Carlos and Tony: PONE-say
  • Poquette, Tom: po-KETT
  • Posedel, Bill: poze-DELL
  • Priddy, Bob: ???
  • Puig, Rick: PWIG (per BR)
  • Pytlak, Frankie: PIT-lack

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top Q

  • Quilici, Frank: KWILL-uh-see
  • Quiñones, Luis and Rey: kee-NYO-naze

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top R

  • Radatz, Dick: RAD-itz
  • Rajsich, Dave and Gary: RAY-sitch
  • Rakow, Ed: ROCK-oh
  • Ranew, Merritt: ruh-NOO
  • Rariden, Bill: ???
  • Raschi, Vic: RASH-ee
  • Ratliff, Paul: RATT-liff
  • Rauch, Bob: ROCK
  • Raymond, Claude: ruh-MONE (evidently not RAY-MONH as it would be in his native French)
  • Reich, Herm: RICH
  • Reichardt, Rick: RYE-kart
  • Reiser, Pete: REESE-er
  • Remy, Jerry: REM-ee
  • Renick, Rick: RENN-ick
  • Repoz, Roger: REE-poze (per Mr. Repoz himself; thanks, Terry and John-William)
  • Reulbach, Ed: ROYLE-bock (per Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Reuschel, Paul and Rick: RUSH-ull
  • Reuss, Jerry: ROYCE
  • Ribant, Dennis: rye-BANNT (per BR)
  • Richbourg, Lance: ???
  • Richert, Pete: RICK-ert (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Rickards, Tex: RICK-erdz (from archived radio broadcast)
  • Rickert, Marv: RICK-urt
  • Ridzik, Steve: RID-zick
  • Riebe, Hank: REE-bee
  • Risberg, Swede: RIZZ-burg
  • Rizzuto, Phil: rih-ZOO-toe (rhymes with ‘prosciutto,’ which if you do not know what it is, should try it sometime with cheese on oven-toasted French bread)
  • Roenicke, Gary and Ron: RENN-uh-key
  • Roettger, Oscar and Wally: RUTT-gur (like a singularized New Jersey university)
  • Rogell, Billy: roe-GELL (hard G)
  • Roggenburk, Garry: ROE-gen-burk (adapted from BR)
  • Rogovin, Saul: ROGG-o-vinn (per old Baseball Register copy, and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Rojas, Cookie: ROE-hoss
  • Rojek, Stan: ROE-jack
  • Romo, Vicente: ??? (question mainly involves the first name)
  • Roque, Jorge: roe-KAY (per BR)
  • Rosario, Jimmy: ???
  • Roush, Edd: ???
  • Rozema, Dave: ROSE-muh
  • Ruether, Dutch: ???
  • Ruhle, Vern: RULE
  • Runge, Ed: RUN-gee
  • Russo, Marius: MARE-ee-us ROO-so
  • Ryba, Mike: REE-bah

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top S

  • Sadek, Mike: SAY-deck
  • Sadowski, Ed: sah-DOW-skee
  • Saffell, Tom: SAFF-el
  • Saier, Vic: SEAR
  • Sallee, Slim: sah-LEE (researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Salin, Tony: SAY-linn (non-MLB, but do you think I’d leave the man off?)
  • Salkeld, Tony: SAWL-keld
  • Salmon, Chico: suh-MONE (Spanish: saul-MONE; Chico was Panamanian)
  • Saltalamacchia, Jarrod: SAL-tal-a-MOCK-ee-ya
  • Saltzgaver, Jack: SAULZ-gay-ver
  • Sanguillén, Manny: san-GEE-en (Spanish: san-gee-YEN)
  • Saucier, Frank: so-SHAY
  • Sauer, Hank: ??? (most likely rhymes with ‘power’)
  • Savage, Ted: ??? (probably SAVV-edge)
  • Saverine, Bob: SAVV-ah-rinn (like ‘aspirin’; BR has it as savv-er-EEN or savv-er-EIN, and I think both are low and outside)
  • Sawatski, Carl: sa-WASS-kee (from old TV broadcast)
  • Sborz, Josh: like ‘spores’ with a B (thanks, MJY)
  • Schaal, Paul: SHAWL
  • Schacht, Al: SHACKED
  • Schaive, Johnny: SHY-vee
  • Schalk, Ray: SHAWK
  • Schaller, Biff: ???
  • Schardt, Bill: ???
  • Scharein, George: SHARR-en (some doubt here)
  • Scheinblum, Richie: SHINE-bloom
  • Scherman, Fred: SURE-man (per BR)
  • Schiraldi, Calvin: shur-ALL-dee
  • Schlueter, Jay: SHLOOT-ur (per BR)
  • Schoendienst, Paul and Red: SHANE-deenst
  • Schroll, Al: ???
  • Schueler, Ron: SHOO-lur (per BR)
  • Schulmerich, Wes: ???
  • Schultz, Jaime: as English ‘Jamie’ (thanks, MJY)
  • Schupp, Ferdie: ???
  • Scioscia, Mike: SO-sha
  • Scull, Angel: SKOOL (homophonic with ‘school’; thanks, John-William)
  • Seager, Corey: like Peter Seeger; SEE-gur, hard G (thanks, MJY)
  • Sebring, Jimmy: SEA-bring
  • Secory, Frank: suh-KOR-ee
  • Segedin, Rob: SEGG-uh-din (thanks, MJY)
  • Seghi, Phil: SEE-gee
  • Segui, David and Diego: suh-GEE
  • Serena, Bill: suh-REE-nuh
  • Serrett, Rudy: suh-RETT (thanks, John-William)
  • Severson, Rich: SEE-ver-son
  • Sewell, Joe: SOO-ul (usually run together to rhyme with ‘tool’)
  • Seyfried, Gordon: SY-frid (thanks, John-William)
  • Shaute, Joe: SHAY-oot
  • Shean, Dave: ???
  • Shellenback, Jim: shell-EN-back
  • Shopay, Tom: show-PAY
  • Show, Eric: SHAU (rhymes with ‘now’)
  • Shuba, George: SHOO-ba
  • Siebert, Sonny: SEE-burt
  • Sierra, Magneuris: magg-NURE-iss (thanks, MJY)
  • Sipin, John: ???
  • Sisler, George: SISS-ler (not verified for Dave and Dick, who came later)
  • Sleater, Lou: SLAY-ter
  • Skowron, Bill: SKAU-run (rhymes with ‘cow fun’)
  • Soderholm, Eric: SODD-er-home
  • Solaita, Tony: so-LEE-tah
  • Soler, Jorge: HOR-hay so-LAIR (thanks, MJY)
  • Sothoron, Allen: ???
  • Span, Denard: duh-NARD (thanks, MJY)
  • Speake, Bob: rhymes with ‘sleek’; from 1957 game broadcast
  • Speaker, Tris: ??? (the question here is the first name pronunciation, likely ‘TRISS’)
  • Spohrer, Al: SPORE-er
  • Spoljaric, Paul: spole-JER-ik (vowels like ‘bowl hair pick’; thanks, MJY)
  • Staehle, Marv: STAY-lee (per BR)
  • Stainback, Tuck: STAIN-back
  • Stallard, Tracy: rhymes with ‘mallard’
  • Stanage, Oscar: STAN-edge
  • Stange, Lee: STANG
  • Starrette, Herm: stah-RETT
  • Staub, Rusty: STOBB
  • Staumont, Josh: STAW-mont (thanks, MJY)
  • Stein, Bill: STYNE (per BR)
  • Steirer, Rick: ???
  • Stelmaszek, Rick: stel-MAY-zik (per BR; sounds right)
  • Strahler, Mike: STRAW-ler (per BR)
  • Strange, Alan: rhymes with ‘range’
  • Strohmayer, John: ???
  • Stubing, Moose: STEW-bing
  • Suarez, Ken: SWAH-rez (he does not spell his name with the accent; born in Tampa)
  • Sudakis, Bill: suh-DAY-kiss
  • Sukeforth, Clyde: SUE-kuh-forth
  • Susce, George: SUE-see
  • Sutter, Bruce: SUE-ter
  • Sveum, Dale: SWAYME (rhymes with ‘same’; abundant sources; thanks, Jesse)
  • Swoboda, Ron: swa-BOE-duh
  • Szczur, Matt: SEE-zur (thanks, MJY)
  • Szekely, Joe: ZECK-lee (the original Hungarian is freaky to our ears; comes out somewhat like ‘seck-EH-yuh’)
  • Szotkiewicz, Ken: ZOT-kee-witz (BR thinks SOCK-uh-witz; I’m guessing his own pronunciation is somewhere in the middle)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top T

  • Tapani, Kevin: TAPP-ah-nee (thanks, Kerry)
  • Tapia, Raimel: ray-MEL (thanks, MJY)
  • Tappe, Elvin and Ted: TAPP-ee
  • Tekulve, Kent: teh-KULL-vee
  • Tesreau, Jeff: TEZ-roe
  • Teufel, Tim: TUFF-ull
  • Theobald, Ron: THEE-o-bald (soft th)
  • Thevenow, Tommy: tev-eh-NOW (thanks, Buddy; verified by living descendant)
  • Thies, Dave and Jake: TEEZ (BR has it as TEESE)
  • Tiefenauer, Bobby: tee-fen-AU-er (rhymes with ‘teeth in power’; BR renders it TEE-fen-ow-er, sounds more likely to me)
  • Tietje, Les: ???
  • Tighe, Jack: TIE
  • Tischinski, Tom: tuh-SHIN-skee
  • Toporcer, Specs: TOE-poor-sir
  • Torre, Frank and Joe – TORR-ee
  • Tost, Lou: TOAST
  • Toth, Paul: rhymes with ‘both’
  • Tovar, César: SAY-zar TOE-var (in Spanish, it would be toe-VAR)
  • Tracewski, Dick: truh-ZOO-skee
  • Tragesser, Walt: ???
  • Troedson, Rich: TRODE-son
  • Trouppe, Quincy: TROOP
  • Tsitouris, Johnny: suh-TORR-iss (BR has it as tiss-i-TOUR-iss; jury’s out)
  • Turner, Trea: TRAY (thanks, MJY)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top U

  • Uecker, Bob: YOO-ker
  • Uhalt, Frenchy: ???
  • Uhlaender, Ted: YOO-lann-der
  • Uhle, George: YOO-lee
  • Umbach, Arnold: UM-baw (per BR)
  • Umbricht, JIm: UM-bryte
  • Unser, Al and Del: UN-sur (rhymes with ‘one sir’; thanks, Alex)
  • Urías, Julio: oo-REE-ahs (thanks, MJY)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top V

  • Valo, Elmer: VOLL-oh
  • Van Atta, Russ: van-AT-ah
  • Van Burkleo, Ty: BURK-lee-oh
  • Vaughan, Arky: VAWN
  • Veeck, William Sr. and Bill: VECK (Yes, yes, as in ‘wreck,’ all right? I’m a huge fan.)
  • Vergez, Johnny: VEER-jess
  • Versalles, Zoilo: ZOE-lo ver-SY-yez (Spanish should be SOY-loh vare-SAW-yez; an old newspaper article says that’s how Vin Scully pronounced it, and proclaims it perfect. I’m not sure about perfect, but Scully probably spoke to Versalles more times than I have.)
  • Veryzer, Tom: ve-RYE-zer
  • Viox, Jim: VEE-ox
  • Vukovich, John: VOO-koe-vitch

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top W

  • Waddell, Rube: wa-DELL
  • Wagner, Honus: HONN-us WAGG-ner (seems it comes from Johannes, then Hannes/Hans)
  • Waitkus, Eddie: WATE-kuss
  • Walker, Gee: ???
  • Wambsganss, Bill: WHAMS-gans (rhymes with ‘Hamm’s cans’; per baseball-reference.com and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Waner, Lloyd and Paul: WAY-nur
  • Warneke, Lon: wor-NUH-kee (this one’s a serious ‘huh?’)
  • Waslewski, Gary: waz-LOO-skee (thanks, Larry)
  • Wathan, John: WAH-thun (first part rhymes with ‘moth’)
  • Wegener, Mike: WEGG-uh-nur (per BR)
  • Weik, Dick: WIKE
  • Weiland, Bob: WHY-lund
  • Weis, Al and Art: WHYSS (rhymes with ‘nice’)
  • Welchonce, Harry: ???
  • Werhas, John: WER-hahs (per BR)
  • Werle, Bill: WHIRL
  • Weyer, Lee: exactly like ‘wire,’ per BR
  • Weyhing, Gus and John: WAY-ing
  • Whitted, Possum: WHITE-ed
  • Wiesler, Bob: WEEZ-ler
  • Wietelmann, Whitey: WEE-tull-man
  • Wiltse, Hooks: WILT-sea (per baseball-reference.com and researched by Mr. Bill Francis of the Baseball Hall of Fame)
  • Witte, Jerry: WITT-ee
  • Wohlford, Jim: WOLE-furd
  • Woodeshick, Hal: WOOD-ah-shick

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top X

  • (no entries yet; evidently there has never been an MLB player with an X name)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top Y

  • Yaztrzemski, Carl: ya-STREM-skee
  • Yde, Emil: EE-dee
  • Yerkes, Steve: ???
  • Yochim, Len and Ray: YO-kum
  • Yost, Ed and Ned: YOAST
  • Younginer, Madison: YUNG-in-er (thanks, MJY)
  • Yvars, Sal: EE-varz

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top Z

  • Zarilla, Al: za-RILL-uh
  • Zauchin, Norm: ZOW-chin (rhymes with ‘how thin,’ I believe)
  • Zdeb, Joe: ZEB
  • Zernial, Gus: ???
  • Zipfel, Bud: ZIFF-ull (if pronouncing it slowly, use the P; thanks, John-William)
  • Zoldak, Sam: ZOLE-dack
  • Zmich, Ed: ???
  • Zych, Tony: ZICK

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Methodology Top Notes on methodology Many players’ names sound different in their languages of origin, raising questions like ‘is it the English way or the Spanish way?’ Immigrants or ethnically enclaved citizens quite often decide to accept Anglicized pronunciations rather than constantly correct everyone. Family pronunciations can shift over time. Sometimes it’s both, as Leo Durocher describes growing up hearing French with his last name pronounced à la française, later Anglicizing it (or deciding to accept same from others). Where I believe that an individual may have pronounced his name differently at home than in the dugout, or just feel like sharing, I offer the correct non-Anglicized option.

This will always be a work in progress, so if readers have new information and can offer source support (i.e. know the family, heard the announcer, happen to speak the language, etc.), please comment to help improve the guide. I expect to get caught out and corrected a lot, and if the source is authoritative, would love to fix it. Highest credibility would be first the individual himself, then his family, then his descendants and teammates. Notes in red represent where I feel uncertain. In many such cases I’m about 95% sure and just don’t feel that’s sure enough. Often my only question is where the accent is, or whether the G is hard, etc. I try not to leap to assumptions, so if you are wondering “how could he be unsure of that?” it’s because he has learned to wait for confirmation. The most common issue is that people send me an update or correction without two of the most important things: accented syllables, and a description of their source. For example, if you’re the player’s nephew, or a personal friend, that’s perfect. But it is very important to have unambiguous phonetics and accenting. Best method is to include a word with which it rhymes, and please never forget that we need the proper accented syllables. We must take this seriously, in my view, because this project will be taken by many as a key source. I’ve already seen a lot of verbatim on baseball-reference.com. Can’t say it simpler: people will rely on this, and better to say nothing than to say wrong and be taken on faith.

If I don’t use the precise phonics you send me, it’s because I felt I had a more precise or less ambiguous way to render them. It’s an imperfect science with English phonics and the Latin characters. I understood what sounds you meant; now I have to make sure that every reader also does. Your contribution was just as helpful.

If you want to scan for red and dig something up to help out, climb into the cage and take some B. I speak passable Spanish and French, so if I’ve made a mistake there that you wish to correct, hopefully you are more fluent than me. I do not speak German or Italian, so I can use all the help I can get there. When you have to eat an elephant, don’t stuff a whole leg in your mouth at once; start with a toe. Thus a wise man once taught me, and for that reason, I have placed some emphasis on players who played more. Not that I’m unwilling to go after guys with one time at bat, or umpires, or coaches, just had to set a priority. If your guy isn’t listed yet, and there’s any question about the pronunciation and you can answer it, I’m ready to list any player, umpire, manager or coach in major league history. I count the Negro Leagues and the All-American Girls’ Professional Baseball League as major leagues, and will include pronunciations from those as readily as I will the AL/NL and predecessors. One nice thing about being the project initiator is that no one gets to veto one’s notions of who belongs.

If you find the comment process tedious, you can email “tc underbar vitki at yahoo dot com.” If you send your input this way, I will assume that privacy played a role, and will make my best efforts to credit you (hopefully I remember that bit) in some way that preserves your privacy.

Old Baseball Registers can be helpful, but they can’t be taken for gospel. I did some digging in the old ones and found a lot of dubious pronunciations.

As the project has progressed from its auspicious launch (massive early hits thanks to an ESPN link), I have learned that a few passionate allies go very far. Buddy, Larry, MJY, you’re what love of the game is all about. Don’t credit me; I began with Salin’s work, did some of my own, but I could not have done all that others have.

96 thoughts on “The Baseball Name Pronunciation Project”

  1. boy, i *like* this.

    since i’ve been watching the game since the late sixties…i believe i can help with some of the ???…reno bertoia is…reno berTOYah. i’ve heard johnny broaca pronounced johnny bro AHcah. the coveleski’s are probably pronounced as they look, since it’s an americanization of the name they were born with, cuvuh LESki. dick drago is dick DRAYgoe. steve foucault is steve fooCOE. bobby grich’s last name rhymes with itch. lerrin lagrow is pronounced exactly like it looks LAIRin laGROE. i’m pretty sure jeff pfeffer’s last name is FEFFer. the unser’s last name is just like the racing family…UNser. i agree with you that hooks wiltse’s last name is most likely to be WILTsea.

    Like

    1. Listening to some interviews in Spanish, evidently there it’s pronounced o-WAL-do AR-ci-ah. I will research some more. He is Venezuelan, and some dialects of Spanish tend to hit an S very softly. Please stay tuned for an update when I feel sure of my factual grounding.

      Like

  2. As a relative of Jeff Pfeffer (of the Dodgers/Cards/Pirates) and, for that matter, of Big Jeff Pfeffer (Braves and Cubs), I must point out that Alex D is mistaken: it is pronounced “Peffer.” (But as someone who was at Tiger Stadium for the ’72 playoffs, I will say that I (and Campy Campaneris) agree with his take on Lerrin LaGrow.)

    Like

  3. Guisto is pronounced Jew-stow….its a friend of mine name…he was born here…his parents were not and that’s how they pronounce their name.

    Like

    1. Thanks, Dave, except that it is ‘Giusti,’ not ‘Giusto.’ One issue I’ve run into is that varying families may pronounce the same name different from area to area, or even generation to generation.

      Like

      1. Ah, I see, Dave, my apologies. I am not directly familiar with Guisto himself except for being on the list, and my brain transposed the vowels, so my mistake there. However, one family may still pronounce the name differently than another. Do you have direct familiarity with Mr. Guisto’s family? If so, their evidence would be authoritative. Absent that, I must still go with Tony Salin’s research. Just as there may be many Lajoies about the nation today, but only those with direct ties to the famous batting champ’s lineage would carry definitive weight. http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/g/guistlo01.shtml also has his name as GISS-toe, though I do not take BBR as necessarily authoritative either (since I don’t know who did that research). In any case, sorry again for the confusion and thanks for weighing in. If you know the player’s family, I’d definitely like to know how they believe he pronounced it.

        Like

  4. Jose Pagan…is pa-Gone. Beauchamp is correct…I remember it from the 1973 Series…it’s Bea-chum. Horacio Pina is Hor-rashe (with long a)-e (Long e)-o (long o). How do I know these, I’m 52 and love the old games and World Series’s. I also have some the WS highlights and games recorded from Baseball’s greatest games show that used to be on satellite channels and ones from the MLB channel when we still had satellite. How about these:

    Jimmy Rosario
    Clay Dalrymple
    Gil Garrido
    Mike Fiore
    Steve Mingori
    Ron Theobald
    Tom Tischinski
    Jim Gosger
    Al Closter
    Gary Waslewski
    Steve Arlin
    Ivan Murrell
    Jimmy Rosario
    Jerry McNertney
    Don Mincher

    Like

    1. Thank you, Larry. Those are from my timeframe as well, but unfortunately, I lived in places where I never got any broadcasts. I learned what was going on from the boxscores. I have a major update coming soon thanks to Buddy, and will add these as well.

      Like

  5. PS: As per the deluxe set of dvd’s from the 1975 WS it’s —– More-et for Roger Moret that was in the bullpen for the Bosox.

    Larry

    Like

  6. With Pat Bourque, is it the same as the hockey player…Ray Bourque which would be like “pour water” as in “Bork”? I’m NOT sure.

    Larry

    Like

    1. Thanks, Larry. My assumption was that it was always BORK, like the hockey standout, but I don’t have confirmation. If they ever put the old Sporting News Registers online in .pdf, this work will make a lot of swift progress.

      Like

  7. Hi,

    Here’s several more to be confirmed:

    Steve Luebber
    Bob Gebhard
    Hal Haydel
    Rick Renick
    Garry Jestadt
    Pete Hamm
    Jim Strickland
    Ray Corbin
    Jim Fairey
    John Strohmayer
    Bob Priddy
    Steve Kealey
    Vicente Romo (I know Romo is like Enrique Romo of the 79 Pirates but I’m not sure about “Vicente”)
    Ted Savage (Is “Savage” like Indian savage”?)
    Rick Auerbach (Is it “back” or is it like “Johann Sebastian Bach”?)

    With Angel Mangual, I heard it on the World Series highlights from 1972-74 as being “Angel” (as in the Bible or God’s Word) and “Mangual” as being man (short A) GWELL which rhymns with wishing well.

    Thanks,

    Larry

    Like

  8. I forgot a couple Reds and a Cardinal/Red Sox:

    Menke (MEN-kee, as in plural of man and house or car key)
    McGlothlin vs McGlothen – like cloth and then lynn and hen (female chicken)
    Larry

    Like

  9. Here are some helps. I’ve been getting some 1971 & 1974 Media Guides for my MVP Baseball 2005 Total Classics 1971 project. Some of them have punctuation “blocks” in them.

    Cardenas–CARD–nus
    Haydel–hay–DELL
    Ratliff–RAT–lif
    Tischinski–Tuh–SHIN–skee
    Luebber–LOO-ber
    Campisi–Cam–PEE–zee
    Alyea–AL–yai
    Quilici–QUILL–uh–see
    Keough–KEE–oh
    Matchick–MAT–chick
    Paepke–PAP–ke
    Severson–SEE-ver–son
    Wohlford–WOHL–ford
    Theobald–Theo–bald
    Krausse–Krouse
    Burda–Bird–da
    DiLauro–di–laura
    Guinn–qwin
    Cedeno–suh–dayn–yo
    Suarez–SWAR–ez
    Uhlaender–YOU–lan–der
    Heidemann–HYDE–a–min
    Ballinger–BAL–in–jer
    Freehan–FREE–ann
    Gutierrez–GOO–tee–err–ess
    Hosley–HOZE–ly
    Jata–JAH–tuh
    Killkenny–KILL-ken–ee
    LaGrow–Lah–GROE
    Lolich–LOE–litch
    Northrup–NOR–thrup
    Szotkiewicz–ZOT–kee–wits
    Hovley–HOVE–lee
    Mingori–Min–GOR–ee
    Reichardt–RYE–kart
    Poquette–Po–KET
    Solaita–So–LEE-ta
    Angelini–An–ja–LEE–nee

    When I get more out of other media guides, I give them to you!

    Larry Kitner

    Like

  10. Thanks man! I’ll soon be getting the 1971 White Sox and Padres Media Guides, so I’ll look at them and see if there are more that I can help with. Thanks for the compliments!!

    Larry

    Like

  11. Here’s a couple more that I missed putting on.

    Renick–RENN–ik
    Boswell–BAHZ–well
    Blyleven–BLY–lev–un
    Killebrew–KILL–uh–broo
    Mitterwald–MITT–er–wahld
    Perranoski–Pair–uh–NAHS–kee
    Soderholm–SODD–er–home
    Tovar–TOE–vahr
    Oliva–Oh–LEE–vuh
    Machemehl–MOCK–e–mel
    Kilkenny (spelling correction)
    Littell–La–TELL
    Patek–PAH–tek
    Rojas–ROW–hoss

    Take care,

    Larry

    Like

    1. I’m digging it, Larry. I think some people will look at some and think ‘isn’t that one obvious’ but I would always rejoin: obvious to whom? I grew up in small towns with no televised baseball and no radio broadcast games. Thus, I rarely heard them pronounced by someone clearly in the know. As I see it, it’s a lot better to include one everyone considers obvious, than leave one out. Take Killebrew. Well, where I live, an hour from Payette, everyone can pronounce it because he’s Idaho’s big baseball hero. That one I knew growing up. But his career is long over, and what if a young person reads about him and wonders: and how the heck do I say his name? That’s what Salin’s work began and that’s what think it should keep being.

      Like

  12. Hey thanks for the compliment…I’m enjoying this too!!! I might try getting a 1971 and/or 1974 baseball registers. I questioned a guy on Ebay with a 1971 and he says and gave me some shots from it and it does show some “puncts” for players. BTW…

    Kekich–KEK–ich
    Shopay–sho–PAY
    Siebert–SEE–bert

    …according to the photo clips that he sent me from the book.

    Take care,

    Larry

    Like

  13. I was listening to the Giants/Padres game of Sept 30, 1971. It mentions the following so far:

    Jestadt–JESS–stad (at)
    Arlin–ARR–lin

    Thanks and MERRY CHRISTMAS!!

    Larry

    Like

    1. Thanks, Larry. I’m behind on updates but have not forgotten. I have gotten a lot of them off old broadcasts as well. Kind of fun to listen to, especially when it’s easy to look up the game on baseball-reference and take note of which players played whose names I need to update. I sure wish I could get John Sipin.

      Like

  14. Hey,

    Here’s a couple more:

    Ron Theobald–THEE-aw-bald
    John Vukovich–VOO-koe-vich
    Ivan Murrell–mur-RELL
    Pat Bourque–BURK

    Thanks and Happy New Year

    Larry

    Like

  15. Hey,

    Here’s another correction according to the 1975 Baseball Register I just got:

    Lynn McGlothen: mc-GLAW-then

    Thanks,

    Larry

    Like

    1. Hmmm, Larry. My info says the second syllable rhymes with ‘glow’ rather than ‘claw.’ I will put it in red until we can figure out what is authoritative. Maybe I can find a Cards 1970s game on YT where he pitched.

      Like

  16. Hey,

    I think that you can take off the red…according to the telecast of the 1974 All Star Game, Curt Gowdy said “mc-GLAW-then. I knew that I remembered it from a kid like that but I couldn’t remember where.

    Thanks,

    Larry

    Like

    1. Heh. Curt Gowdy’s the one who called my hometown of Hutchinson, KS a ‘hick town.’ Not, of course, that this makes his pronunciation incorrect, but since I had a reliable previous report of the other pronunciation, I’d feel best if we had a second authoritative source. Do you know of one?

      Like

    2. I’ll do my part: I put in a call to the Grambling AD. I hope they respond. He went to school there, so he is probably more important to them proportionately than he is to a MLB database, and someone probably knows. Hope so.

      Like

    1. Hmmmm. Well, that’s pretty strong backup documentation. Someone who rarely plays or just had a cup of coffee, maybe it doesn’t keep coming up, but when you are in an all-star game, probably the announcers have met you at some point. I would like to give it a bit more thought, but I’m leaning your direction. Thanks, as ever, for your ongoing and very valuable help!

      Like

  17. Charlie Leibrandt….LEE brant
    Calvin Schiraldi…shur ALL dee
    I don’t know about Joe Lis or Joe Edelen
    Denny Lewallyn…loo ellen
    Jeff Mutis..MYEW tiss
    I always liked the really funny names like Gardenhire, Spooneybarger, Pastornicky, etc and the ones that just rolled off the tongue in polysyllabic glory. This means you, Porfirio Altamirano!

    Like

  18. For Hooks (& brother Snake) Wiltse, ‘wilte-sea’ is incorrect. It is ‘Wilts.’ ‘Wilt-sea’ is correct for Hal Wiltse.

    Like

  19. •”Lefebvre, Jim and Tip” — who is Tip? Is that supposed to be Bill “Lefty” Lefebvre (with capital ‘F’)? If so, his last name is pronounced Le FAVE.

    Like

  20. Hey,

    BTW…Jim Lefebvre is pronounced…Le FEE ver and Joe Lefebvre is le-FAY (as in 1983 Phillies.

    Here’s one for you…Ray Busse.

    Thanks,

    Larry Kitner

    Like

  21. I answered another one of mine…Fiore. It’s FEE-or-ee…as per radio game between the Bosox and Yankees in early 1971.

    Thanks,

    Larry Kitner

    Like

  22. I’m sorry but you got “Fiore” wrong on your listing…it’s “FEE-or-ee”. It’s different than what you put.

    Thanks,

    Larry

    Like

    1. Great, Larry. I was actually able to find Lubratich, and it was a good example of why I ask for sources (you are always great about providing them when you offer a pronunciation; greatly value your contributions).

      On most matters, baseball-reference.com is excellent, but like me, they are human and doing their best. They have him as LU-bra-tich. Steve’s alma mater, UC Riverside, won a national title with him in the lineup and reveres his glory accordingly, and they pronounce it as I have presented it. So: while I respect b-r.com, I can’t know what their source was. I do have a source that can draw on living memory of watching the guy play, so I have to go with that one. When I just get a comment without a source reference (even if it’s ‘listened on the radio for his whole career’), I could be putting out wrongness. And that’s no good, because this is the only online source focused purely on the title subject. No likey wrong. Researchers may decide to cite this site as a source. If I jump the gun, ouch.

      Like

      1. Hey Bud,

        Thanks for the info!!! I agree 200%. I’d rather listen or watch an actual baseball or get a pretty good clue in a team media guide, but the telecasts are better.

        Thanks,

        Larry

        Like

      2. Yeah, I think most of the broadcasters are mostly right, especially when it’s a home team radio broadcast. I don’t always take them for gospel, but they become the front-runners on pronunciation.

        Like

  23. Hey,

    Here’s a couple for ya.

    Dave Pagan (1974 Yankees & 1976 Orioles) –PAY-gan (hard “G” not “j”)
    Gary Waslewski (1971 Yankees)–waz-LOU-ski
    Jack Aker (1971 Yankees)–A-ker
    Roger Hambright (1971 Yankees)–HAM-brite

    Thanks,

    Larry Kitner

    Like

    1. Thanks, Larry. My information about Dave Pagan’s name is different so I wrote to a source: the community college where he used to play, on which same field my old baseball league in Seattle used to play sometimes. He was their first player to make the majors, so they remember him strongly. Hopefully they will respond to my inquiry.

      Like

  24. I just found this site today for the first time. I’ve read over some of the comments from yesteryear.

    I saw the comment mentioning some names Lefebvre are pronounced La-FAVE. When Joe Lafebvre came up with the Yankees in 1980, their radio team generally referred to him as either La-FAVE or La-FAY, tough to say with old-fashioned AM radio static, and basically per the comment. In the late 1960s, however, Curt Gowdy used to pronounce the name of a different player, Jim Lefebvre, as La-FEEB-er.

    I’d like to know about Chet Laabs and Hank Sauer.

    The football Sauers were pronounced Sour, but I don’t remember Garagiola doing so, and I think Hank’s name came up in an old story or two.

    I saw the Knabe comment. I saw some filmed commentary once, from a historian, in a baseball documentary; I can’t remember whether it was Ken Burns’ baseball; who used the pronunciation ka-NOB-uh. It’d been years since I had seen the player’s name for the first time in print, in Robert Creamer’s Babe Ruth biography, in a section about the Federal League. I never heard the players name over those years until I finally saw that film. I don’t know whether the pronunciation is correct.

    Like

    1. To be honest, Michael, it was just luck, happened to be checking. Usually I’m slower. But I always appreciate input from those with info that helps get this that little bit farther.

      Like

  25. Hey,

    I watched my recordings off of ESPN Classic (?) of the 1974 Series and they pronounced Auerbach “OUR-back”, and at the transit authority where I used to work, we had a mechanic named Bill Auer and it was pronounced (OUR). Also, I have recordings of the 83 Series and it was Joe (la-FAY), and I heard from another set that it was Jim (le-FEE-ver).

    Thanks,

    Larry Kitner

    Like

    1. When I was in Seattle, during the years of the “Lefebvre believers,” everyone said Jim’s name as you present it, Larry. However, ‘everyone’ is capable of being mistaken, as I always remind myself, and errors can become the accepted reality. In Auerbach’s case, it could even be a function of how fast he says it. Back in the PIL days, one of my favorite acq-eds’ last name was “Gauerke.” I would have pronounced it GOW-ur-kee. However, on the phone, she said it like “GAR-kee”. If she were saying it more slowly, I think she would have used all three syllables. It wouldn’t shock me if Rick pronounced his in the same ways. Opinions?

      Like

  26. Yes, that semi-modern music industry guy, G-Money, on rare occasion, I’ve heard someone bring him up and pronounce his name, with a soft G, as in Jee. Jeep with the P left off. The ballplayer? I couldn’t say.

    Like

  27. Hi,

    I got the cd of game 1 of the 1970 AL playoffs with Baltimore and Minnesota and Alyea started in left. The broadcasters pronounced it “AL (like Al Oliver)-yay”.

    Thanks,

    Larry

    Like

    1. Heh. In other news, Brant Alyea started in a playoff game. Thanks, Larry! I might later include a note if we find out that the world pronounced it one way and the player pronounces it another.

      Like

  28. He was pretty good in 1970 for the Twins…he hit 291 with 16 HRs and 61 RBIs. In Game 1, he hit a shot to CF and Paul Blair made a super catch to prevent a HR. He also started the 2nd Game against Dave McNally, another lefty. It’s also the game where Mike Cuellar hit a wind-blown grand-slam HR that came back fair just inside the rightfield foul pole. That was really interesting to hear that broadcasted!!!

    Thanks,

    Larry

    Like

What's on your mind?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blogging freelance writing and life in general.

%d bloggers like this: